HUNGER RELIEF

For every pound of blue catfish sold through WNP’s distribution partnerships, about one portion is donated for hunger-relief. 

 Chef Emily Hagel, of Miriam's Kitchen cooking blue catfish cakes. MK aims to end chronic homelessness in Washington, D.C.

Chef Emily Hagel, of Miriam's Kitchen cooking blue catfish cakes. MK aims to end chronic homelessness in Washington, D.C.

Buying 125 pounds for a restaurant group means 125 neighbors in need can be served a nourishing fish dinner at a local soup kitchen; a grocer that buys 900 pounds ensures that 900 people are fed delicious, local fish by another community organization. WNP is the only seafood-related business or organization in the Bay region that has a matching donation of this level. And it's a win for all, as the fish is just delicious.

More than 49 million people in the U.S. struggled with hunger in 2013, according to the USDA's Economic Research Service. At the core of the WNP mission is our belief that there needs to be an intentional focus on distributing food that is nourishing to those who are hungry. This approach to hunger relief sends a strong message to community members that they matter. And it also is key if we are to mitigate diet-related public health crises like diabetes and heart disease. These diseases disproportionately impact low-income individuals.

“Many at the luncheon reflected that they hadn’t had the chance to enjoy fresh fish in decades.”

To get fish efficiently and safely to those who are struggling with hunger, WNP works with well-established organizations that already have deep relationships in the communities they serve. We:  

  • vet the organizations for food safety practices,
  • offer recipes for preparing blue catfish,
  • and ensure the fish arrives at their location on time and just as they need it.

The fish comes precisely as it would if ordered by any restaurant, university, or other customer; only it is free or well below market cost.

WNP is pleased to be supporting an increasing number of hunger-relief agencies. As WNP grows, the list will grow, as well. Said Paul Entis, of the Jewish Food Experience, who organized a lunch that featured WNP-donated blue catfish:  “The women absolutely loved the opportunity to feast on fresh fish.  Many at the luncheon reflected that they hadn’t had the chance to enjoy fresh fish in years, and in some cases decades.” You can read more about this lunch and other special meals with WNP fish on our blog.

If there's a hunger relief organization you think could use the help of the Wide Net Project, please keep in mind that our donations are supported by your donations, and also by proceeds from sales of fish. The Get Involved page can give you more info about how easy it is to make a difference through WNP.